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New Work / New York: Nancy Arlen, Louisa Chase, Rudy Heintze, F.L. Schroder, David Wells

New Work / New York: Nancy Arlen, Louisa Chase, Rudy Heintze, F.L. Schroder, David Wells

Exhibitions
New Work / New York: Nancy Arlen, Louisa Chase, Rudy Heintze, F.L. Schroder, David Wells
December 8 1979 – February 8 1980
“The five artists in this exhibition strive to excite, energize, and give pleasure to their audience through the directness and sensuousness of their work. A current tendency, evident here, is the adaptation of novel or entertaining qualities to serious art, in order to fuse public and private concerns. In his or her own way, each of the artists puts forth the notion of making art as "playing,” as each relies on his or her resourcefulness and inventiveness for unexpectedly seductive or humorous imagery, materials, and methods.“
- Susan Logan and Allan Schwartzman, “New Work/New York” catalogue.

”“New Work/New York’ [is] an exhibition of painting and sculpture by artists living and working in New York City…The five artists selected for the exhibition maintain distinctly individual approaches to making art; their works reflect the current diversity and vitality of this city’s art community.”
“Nancy Arlen casts brightly colored tubular plastic sculptures of simple abstract forms clamped to the wall. She chooses hues and, materials that amalgamate easily approachable, but enigmatic forms. Louisa Chase’s large, vivid paintings on canvas are crowded and active with fragmented representational images. Rudy Heintze constructs painted wood reliefs in which he consolidates geometric and vaguely associative forms to articulate unusual spaces, heightened in dramatic effect by somber, yet striking color combinations. F. L. Schroder’s highly textured painted aluminum pieces have strong, yet subtle hues and emphasize horizontal expanses and diagonal shifts. David Wells’ simple, mechanized constructions of representational images in subdued tones utilize materials, objects, and pictorial themes often discovered in his neighborhood.”
- from The New Museum Press Release
December 8 1979 – February 8 1980